The Competitive Workforce Alliance Allied Health Summit: Taking the Pulse on Healthcare; A New Prescription for the Workforce is a Big Success

 

ALLIED HEALTH SUMMIT
Click here for presentations and documents
 
Centralina WDB Executive Director David Hollars welcomes attendees to the Allied Health Summit.
 
Dr. Adam Zolotor, Vice President of the North Carolina Institute of Medicine, gave an analysis of what the Affordable Care Act means for North Carolina.
 
Summit attendees included medical and workforce development professionals.
 

From how changes in health care laws will impact North Carolina, to how the ability to collect large amounts of computer data are changing the healthcare workforce, The Competitive Workforce Alliance Allied Health Summit: Taking the Pulse on Healthcare; A new Prescription for the Workforce, hit the mark. "This was fabulous," said Meg Patchett, Provost of Cabarrus College of Health Sciences. "I walked away with practical, information I can use tomorrow," said Connie Roseborough, a recruiter for Novant Health. "This Summit had something for all of our members," said David Hollars, Executive Director of Centralina Workforce Development Board and the Workforce Intermediary for the Allied Health Regional Skills Partnership. "When we started the Partnership 5 years ago, our goal was to bring workforce professionals, employers and educators together to find ways to build a strong healthcare workforce. This Summit is one result of that effort." "It's our goal to have the Summit become a valuable resource for the development of a well-trained and prepared allied health workforce," said Pau Morlock, VP of HR at Stanly Regional Medical Center and the Chair of the Competitive Workforce Alliance Allied Health Regional Skills Partnership, host of the Summit.

Dr. Adam Zolotor, Vice President of the North Carolina Institute of Medicine opened the event with an analysis of what the Affordable Care Act means for North Carolina, noting that 1.5 million or nearly 12% of our population is uninsured and has been for some time. "These figures are both children and adults," said Dr. Zolotor. "The elderly are not included in this number since they are eligible for Medicare." "We will need a larger and better trained workforce to meet the expected increase in demand. "

Michelle Lyn, PhD, Duke Division of Community Health, Duke Medical Center told the gathering, "Community-based healthcare works; it cuts costs and can be implemented successfully. We have created a home-based care model that has healthcare workers, social workers, mental health and other needed professionals working together to better serve those with long-term care needs. We have dramatically cut costs by reducing the need for multiple hospital visits and connecting people to their communities and increasing their quality of life."

Susanne Gaddis, PhD, also known as The Communications Doctor told the crowd that, "Your communication can alter your work experience, the experience of patients, your co-workers and even your family. By focusing on the positive you can increase productivity, cooperation and connectedness. "

Other topics of interest included how blind spots or hidden biases affect patient care, and how roles in allied health professions are changing.

Thank you to our Session Sponsors: Novant Health and the Competitive Workforce Alliance, our Investor Sponsors: Carolinas Healthcare, Stanly Regional Medical Center, Centralina Workforce Development Board, Charlotte Works, and Western Piedmont Workforce Development, and our Supporter Sponsors: Gaston Workforce Board, Central Piedmont Community College and Winston-Salem State University.

Allied Health Summit Presentations and Documents (PDF)

We extend a BIG thank you to our sponsors:

 
         

The Competitive Workforce Alliance is a Partnership of the Following Workforce Development/Investment Boards